About David Daly


Global Deal Assurance Manager at Worldline and member of the Scientific Community

David is the Global Deal Assurance Manager at Worldline, the European leader in the payment and transactional services industry. He is also a Worldline member of the Atos Scientific Community where he is leading the Digital Business Transformation track. In addition he is a Worldline Distinguished Expert with a focus on Agile and DevOps, as well as being a Fellow of the British Computer Society and holding Chartered IT Professional status. He has worked within the technology industry for over 18 years in a variety of roles including developer, analyst, technical architect and development manager. He is a regular public speaker who often challenges conventionally accepted wisdom and has a passion for proving that alternative approaches can produce better results. He lives in Nottingham with his better half, his 2 young daughters and a female cat called Bob. Outside of work David enjoys running and playing piano in a 60s covers band.




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Articles posted by David Daly

Where are you on your DevOps journey?

I am really excited that we have just released the first version of our Open Source DevOps Maturity Assessment tool. It’s a quick, easy way for any team to get insights into their current DevOps capability, and to learn how they might further improve. In return for 20 minutes of your time to complete the questions, you get a…

The Digital Business Continuum

Posted on: Feb 13, 2018 by David Daly Over the last few months I have had the honor of working together with my colleagues in the Atos Scientific Community to write our latest white paper, entitled The Digital Business Continuum: Enabling organizations to thrive amidst disruption. In one of my previous posts, I described how companies who attempt to copy, in a superficial way,…

Freedom Day

Diary Entry: 24th March, 2034 So it’s certain now. The machines have won. Writing this diary entry now, early in 2034, I realize it wasn’t really a surprise to any of us that this would happen. People had been predicting for years that so-called artificial intelligence would mean that computers would become the dominant species on the planet. But what maybe did surprise us (or me at…

Cargo Cult Digital Transformation

One of my long-time favorite articles about software development is Cargo Cult Software Engineering by Steve McConnell. In it he cites Richard Feynman who used this metaphor to describe practices that have the semblance of being scientific, but do not in fact follow the scientific method: "In the South Seas there is a cargo cult of people. During the war they saw airplanes with…

DevOps: From silos to service-centric teams

Since October 2015 I have been part of the Atos Scientific Community and, in that role, I have been working with my colleagues towards the publication of Journey 2020. In Journey 2020 we decided to detail some of the challenges that large traditional organisations can face when trying to adopt DevOps and, in doing so we ended up making…

The Urgency for DevOps Adoption

Whilst working on the recently published whitepaper “Enterprise DevOps: Building a Service Oriented Organisation” one thing we had to give consideration to was what role, if any, Bi-Modal IT (or other similar models) should play. Our early drafts had no mention of Bi-Modal IT, but during the revision process we concluded that a paper about Enterprise DevOps would not be complete or…

Enterprise DevOps: Building a Service Oriented Organisation

Over the past few months I have had the privilege of working together with experts from across Atos and also from Paderborn University to put together the latest whitepaper from the Atos Scientific Community. In this paper we focus on how DevOps can be successfully implemented at enterprise scale, drawing extensively on others’ experience and our own (both internally…

Hackathons Don’t Just Build Software

Typical timelines for software projects are usually measured in months or years. So how much can you achieve in just 7 hours? This is something that I found myself wondering as I took the elevator up to the 7th floor of the UK Legal Aid Agency’s London offices to join them for their most recent hackathon. The day itself was a frenzy of…

DevOps Everywhere

Recently several people have said to me that DevOps cannot be a good choice for all software development. In fact, it seems a commonly held belief that certain categories of application (usually those with a high cost of failure) are not appropriate candidates for a DevOps approach. This is a misconception: DevOps can and should be applied to all software development within an organisation. In my experience,…

DevOps: The Answer to Everything?

Earlier this year renowned ITIL expert Shirley Lacy presented “DevOps in a Cloud Environment” at the 2015 BCS Configuration Management Conference. During her talk, she posed the question “What is DevOps?” to which one audience member jokingly responded “the answer to everything” (a moment captured by Tuuli Sutinen here). And indeed sometimes it does really feel like, no matter what the questions…

DevOps or Die?

In July Hubert Tardieu wrote in his post Journey to 2018: Surfing the B2B Tsunami that: “As the 3rd Digital Revolution ensues, organizations can no longer ignore the warning signs, we estimate that businesses have around two years to prepare, adapting their core processes and culture to thrive in a world of Digitalization.” And for many businesses, to survive in a Digital world, building a…

How will Customer Information on Rail Evolve?

It is always fun to future-gaze: to wonder how current technology trends like big data, wearable devices, the Internet of Things and ubiquitous connectivity will impact the delivery of customer information on the railways in the future. But actually I think it is better to be driven by passenger need rather than technology. Fortunately in the UK we have…

Next Generation Passenger Information

When talking about innovation with customers I sometimes quote the legendary author William Gibson (known for coining the term “cyberspace”), who once said: “The future is already here, it's just not very evenly distributed.” In my view innovation is not just about inventing, it is also about distributing. And often it is the latter that takes the longest, is the hardest to achieve and…

The Rise of the Social (Rail) Network?

Social networking has taken the world by storm. Twitter first went live in 2006 and by 2007 was already seeing usage at 400,000 tweets per quarter. In just seven years that has increased over 100,000 times to a staggering 255 million active users sending 500 million tweets per day in 2014. Facebook has a similar story: 1 million monthly…

Agile Myths: Non-Functional Requirements Not Supported

Martha Graham (who was named "Dancer of the Century" by Time magazine and awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1976) once said: "Nothing is more revealing than movement" And I found these words surfacing in my mind when we recently had a discussion within our architecture community about how non-functional requirements (such as security and performance) should be…

Agile Myths: You Will Deliver Faster and Cheaper

Probably the two most widely cited sources for the Agile-is-faster-and-cheaper myth are "The Agile Impact Report" from QSMA and "How Agile Projects Measure Up, and What This Means to You" from the Cutter Consortium and written by Michael Mah. Both studies indicate that Agile development results in higher productivity and faster delivery, when compared to industry averages. The…

Agile Myths: Predictability Lost

There seems to me to be a fairly common view that an Agile approach to software development is less predictable than a traditional (waterfall) method. Steve McConnell's comments in his post on the business impact and business benefits of Agile are typical of this sentiment: "True agility - which means adopting a posture that allows you to respond rapidly to changing market conditions and customer demands…

Agile Myths: Change Without Cost

Way back in 1981 Barry Boehm published his book Software Engineering Economics. In it he included the Cost of Change Curve (which he had previously published in a 1976 IEEE article) which showed that the cost of change grows exponentially as software development progresses through the stages of requirements, design, code, test and production. It indicates that making a change after software…

Hypothetical Value

One of the most useful concepts that I have come across when trying to understand the benefits of an Agile approach is the idea of value being hypothetical. I first came across this whilst watching this excellent and highly entertaining talk by Jeff Patton where he says: "The big myth here is that value is predictable, but in fact we know it is hypothetical. When we decide to build…

The Simplicity Advantage

Over the last couple of months I have found myself thinking time and time again of this quote attributed to Bruce Lee: “One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity.” When working on or reviewing technical architecture, software designs or code I always feel un-easy if the solution is starting to…

What Belongs In The Cloud?

The use of cloud technologies will be high on the agenda for many during 2013. Indeed, Gartner’s recent report listed cloud computing as one of the top three priorities amongst the 2,053 CIOs they surveyed. However the benefits of cloud computing are not always clear and this interesting analysis challenges the idea that cloud offerings will always lower costs. So does cloud…

Legacy Code: When Should You Rewrite It?

A couple of years ago I rewrote one of the smaller products that my team has responsibility for. We needed to add significant new functionality and the existing software’s design was going to make this challenging. Hence, I took the decision to rewrite the existing code in a way that would make it quicker to add the new features…

A New Era of Project Management?

When I presented a paper at the APM Conference back in 2008 (there is a good write up of this event in this IPMA newsletter) I suggested that it was time to carve a new direction for project management in 3 key ways: - Focussing more on people - Concentrating on delivering value - Moving away from following a single project…