Watch this space: The consequences of a stolen phone


Posted on: June 24, 2013 by Paul Albada Jelgersma

Atos - Watch this space: The consequences of a stolen phoneYour wallet is stolen. You wanted to pay for your tall latte and it is gone. You search all of your pockets and looked around, bewildered. Maybe somebody found it and will hand it to you. No. It’s gone. The nice lady at the counter understands and gives you your coffee anyhow. That’s nice. It doesn’t change the fact that your wallet is stolen. In your mind you create a list of everything that is in it. Some money, the tickets for the theater, your bank card and your credit card, some pictures of your children and a business card you got while you bumped into an old friend on your way to the coffee shop.

So now you reach for your phone, you have to call the bank to block your cards, you do not want some punk to get his dirty hands on your salary.

Oh @#$%^&*, your phone is gone too…

In a recent white paper of the Atos Scientific Community the security aspects of mobile devices is addressed , as well as other aspects in the management of devices in the new bring-your-own-device concept that is being allowed by many companies and full heartedly embraced by employees. The quotes below are from that white paper.

“Enterprise Mobile Management solutions currently available in the market address different aspects of BYO. Balancing those with network & access as well as data and applications usage will pave the way for a successful BYO implementation…”

Ok. It is gone, you do a quick mental inventory of what is on your phone. Access to your personal and business email, Twitter and Facebook account. Your contact list of about 400 people with their email addresses, home addresses and telephone number included. On top of that access to your DropBox account with all the info on a recent bid and the complete cost break down of all products. And because you have a new NFC enabled phone, your credit card is also in digital format on your phone. Now what?

“The key area to support BYO in 2016 will be tablets and their descendants (e.g. wearable computers), along with smartphones. We see these as the two key device segments.”

The white paper does not only cover this case of a stolen phone – it goes into all measures you can take if you adopt the bring-your-own-device scenario in your company. What to do with applications, data and network access; all these aspects are clearly explained and some best practices are listed for any CxO that is looking into this.

“Security in such dynamic environments as BYO must be built on the assumption that anyone or any device may get access to the data, but that only authorized users should be able to use it for the intended and agreed purpose, and under a defined context.”

“Sir? Is this yours?” When you turn around you see a nice person holding up both your phone and wallet – you start breathing again. At the same time you think about what you could do to avert the disaster that did not happen this time.

Share this blog article


About Paul Albada Jelgersma

Global Head Atos IoT Solutions and member of the Scientific Community
Paul has over 30 years of experience in running IT and business programs; including managing large teams of IT and other professionals. Paul is a founding member of the Atos Scientific Community. In his day job, he focusses on developing and delivering Internet of Things Solutions for our customers. Paul likes to work with Virtual Teams in the new way of work. He dislikes email as a chat and document-management tool. He occasionally writes articles and publishes at his own blog. Paul is married and has 2 children. He lives near Amsterdam, The Netherlands. He likes to travel, moderate hiking and watch Netflix series.

Follow or contact Paul